The Curious Case Of Vikram Buddhi–>By Dr. Shah Alam Khan

Below is the article by an Indian doctor on the issue of Vikram Buddhi, who got jailed for just expressing his views. Allegedly he just gave few remarks about George W Bush on a website.

Hopefully the guy will find justice and will be freed soon.

Also please sign the petition for Vikram’s release:

http://www.petitiononline.com/freevb/petition.html

The Curious Case Of Vikram Buddhi

Source : http://www.countercurrents.org/khan131209.htm

By Dr. Shah Alam Khan

13 December, 2009
Countercurrents.org

It is ironical that the day President Barrack Obama held his Nobel Peace medal in hand, the American judiciary soiled its hand with blood of justice…….cold and savage. Again the American consciousness failed to separate the good from the bad. And yet again an innocent was sacrificed at the altar of lady of liberty, the symbol of freedom and hope for millions across America. The sentencing of Vikram Buddhi, the IIT Alumnus from India has come as rude shock in this part of the world. The curious case of Mr. Buddhi, a graduate of the IIT Mumbai, is an eye-opener for all those who till date believed in the fairness of the American legal system.

The case of Mr. Vikram Buddhi is perplexing. In December 2005, an Internet message appeared urging the people of Iraq to avenge the death of 312,769 Iraqi women and children. Subsequently this message was traced to the computer of Vikram Buddhi, a graduate student at Purdue University in Indiana. Vikram was picked up for interrogation and released on January 18, 2006 by the U.S. Secret Service, complete with a report that he posed no threat.

For obscure reasons, in May 2006 he was mysteriously picked up again and jailed. The case went to trial, crucial evidence was hidden from the jury by a hostile judge, and a guilty verdict was returned on June 25, 2007. Finally on December 11, 2009 he was handed a four years nine months prison sentence. So much for posting hate messages against the then President George W Bush and his team of gangsters. I suppose if this was his crime, then at least half the world’s population would be behind bars! We all know how popular the butcher of Baghdad was!

America and its claim of freedom has been under the scanner for long. Post 9/11 the American claims of justice, egalitarianism and liberty have been admonished on a regular basis. No wonder, President Obama announced the closing down of the Guantanamo Bay detention camp in his first Presidential address to the nation. It is important that in a world with impending terrorist threats every country has a right to defend its land and subjects. But it is also noteworthy that governments have no right to trample human dignity in the name of salvaging freedom and liberty. Needless to say American establishment has a habit to stamp on the rights of others. Their past and recent misadventures in the Middle East, Vietnam, Central America, Rwanda and Afghanistan are an appalling testament for the same.

The tombstones in America’s human right cemetery have a grim story to tell. Vikram Buddhi’s case is not the only one. The mockery of justice and legality in the legally correct land is a regular feature. Although it is a different matter that those who suffer are African Americans, Native Indians or expatriates from the third world; the not so equals in an otherwise “equal & just” American social order.

The most glaring of all cases is that of Gary Tyler, an African-American, who is serving a life sentence in Louisiana. He was convicted by an all-white jury in 1974 for the murder of a 13-year-old Timothy Weber, a white student who was shot during intense racial clashes in Destrehan, Louisiana. Tyler, who was 17 at the time of the incident, has consistently denied involvement in the crime. In yet another story of blatant violation of human rights at the hand of an unjust legal system, two prisoners Herman Wallace and Albert Woodfox languish in solitary confinement for the last 37 years in a prison in Angola, Lousiana. Their crime, political activism in prison. No other living prisoner in the United States is believed to have spent so long in solitary confinement as these two. And of course who can forget the thrashing of Rodney King in March 1991 at the hands of Los Angeles Police officers, the custodians of law.

There is no justification to the obscenity of Vikram Buddhi’s remarks on the internet. Equally there is no justification of handing him a half baked prison sentence, concluded in secrecy and painted with prejudice and hate. The American people should realize that it is not what he said is important, but why he said it. The universal detestation for America comes from its extraordinary record of war and destruction across the globe. American hegemony and its fall out is something which should worry the common American as a citizen of this world. Aggression breeds frustration and frustration breeds people who are vulnerable to the follies of the rabid. How lop sided can the American system be in condemning the handling of Roxana Saberi’s case by the Iranian authorities when they themselves have a Vikram Buddhi at hand? Justice is a bewildering weapon. Its presence can be sweet and fresh but equally it can hand a savage blow to the very cause it is meant to fulfill. American establishment and most importantly the American people need to introspect. Vikram’s case has revealed the vulnerability of their system.

It won’t be long before the American dream dies for millions of Indian students who wanted to go the same path as Vikram Buddhi; but for the common American the nightmare has only begun. Freedom of expression, freedom of speech and freedom of identity are at stake. Once all Indians, all Chinese, all Arabs, all Blacks, all Browns and all Natives are swallowed by the legal American anaconda, it will come for their blood.

Dr. Shah Alam Khan
Associate Professor
Department of Orthopedics
All India Institute of Medical Sciences
New Delhi, India

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Day That Shook the World

by Eric Margolis

In 1975, physicist Andrei Sakharov and a group of fellow Soviet academicians warned the Kremlin leadership that unless the nation’s ruinous defense spending was slashed and funds refocused on modernizing the nation’s decrepit, obsolete industrial base and its wretched state agriculture, the Soviet Union would collapse by 1990.

Their grim warning was prescient. Twenty years ago this week – 9 November, 1989 – boisterous German crowds forced open the hated Berlin Wall, Communist East Germany collapsed in black farce, and the once mighty Soviet Empire began to crumble.

This was one of modern history’s most dramatic and dangerous moments. No one knew if the dying Soviet Union would expire peacefully, or ignite World War III.

In November, 1989, the vast empire built by Stalin that stretched from East Berlin to Vladivostok was on its last legs. The USSR had 50,000 battle tanks and 30,000 nuclear warheads, but could not feed its people. Military spending consumed 20% of the economy. As I saw for myself while traveling around the Soviet Union in the late 1980’s, conditions were often primitive, even third world outside the big cities.

Afghanistan’s “mujahidin” had all but defeated the mighty Red Army. Poland’s Solidarity Union, secretly funded by Pope John Paul and the CIA through Panamanian shell companies, had risen in revolt. So, too, ever rebellious Hungarians, joined by Lithuanians and East Germans.

The old joke in Moscow was that the East Germans were the only people who could make Communism work. Now they were in revolt.

The reformist Soviet president Mikhail Gorbachev had to make a fateful decision: allow events to take their course, or order the Red Army and KGB to crush the spreading uprisings – and run the risk of war with NATO, particularly so if the Warsaw Pact’s armies turned their guns against the Soviet occupation forces and fighting spread across the Inner German Border.

Unlike his brutal Soviet predecessors, Mikhail Gorbachev was a man of profound moral values, a genuine humanist and idealist who believed he could reform the USSR through democratic socialism and patient, open debate – his “glasnost and perestroika.”

After a violent incident staged by Communist hard-liners in the Baltic, President Gorbachev refused to use force against his own people.

But once fear of repression was removed, the Soviet Union, a nation of 120 languages spread over eleven time zones, shattered. Gorbachev simply could not control the ensuing whirlwind of nationalism his reforms had sown.

Today, most Russians revile Gorbachev for wrecking the Soviet Union. The sinister Communist era, including Stalin’s monstrous crimes, are being sugarcoated with nostalgia.

Russia’s Prime Minister, Vladimir Putin, called the collapse of the Soviet Union “the greatest tragedy of the 20th century.”

In truth, the Soviet Union was history’s most brutal, murderous tyranny that killed three times more victims than Hitler.

Gorbachev did not plan to destroy the Soviet Union but to reform and revitalize it. But by refusing to hold it together by force, he brought about its doom.

Gorbachev did the world a huge favor.

In any event, the Soviet Union was destined to crumble, Gorby or no Gorby. Like the old Ottoman Empire, the USSR could only survive by gobbling up its neighbors.

In 1989, the state that had run on virtual war footing since 1945, died of exhaustion. As Voltaire said of Prussia, the Soviet Union was an army, disguised as a state.

For me, Gorbachev was one of the greatest men of our time. He put international law, basic humanity, and civilized behavior before the demands of brute power. We must also salute Gorbachev’s chief lieutenant and powerhouse behind the reform movement, former Georgian KGB chief and Soviet Foreign Minister, Eduard Schevardnadze, who urged total de-communization and disarmament.

Later, as president of independent Georgia, Shevardnadze was overthrown – ironically – by a US-organized revolution.

Gorbachev purged hardeners from the Soviet military-industrial complex, vetoed an antimissile system, sharply downsized the Soviet military, and wisely ended the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan, a lesson Nobel Peace Prize Winner Barack Obama has yet to learn.

But when Gorbachev and Shevardnadze sensibly sought total nuclear disarmament, President Ronald Reagan, obsessed by the unworkable Star Wars antimissile project, refused Russia’s offer that would have eliminated all nuclear weapons and missiles.

Other courageous Russians reformers who helped end the Cold War deserve to be remembered: Anatoly Chernayev; Georgi Shakhnazarov; former ambassador to Canada, Alexander Yakovlev; and Gorbachev’s brave, cerebral wife and confidante, Raisa.

Germany’s Chancellor Helmut Kohl and President H.W. Bush also merit kudos for their able management of the Cold war’s end. By contrast, Britain’s Margaret Thatcher shamefully relapsed into Europe’s evil old ways by trying to block German unification.

President Gorbachev kept begging the western powers to launch another Marshall Plan to rescue the dying Soviet Union and democratize it. Tragically, they did not. Instead, the Clinton administration chose to treat the new, battered Russia as a client state.

Communist die-hards launched a farcical, drunken coup against Gorbachev that was thwarted by the courage of the then still sober Russian president, Boris Yeltsin; Aviation Marshall Yevgeny Shaposhnikov; and – a story that is still little known in the west – KGB moderates.

In 1990, I was the first western journalist ever allowed into the dreaded Lubyanka Prison, the headquarters of KGB, to interview senior KGB officers of the elite First Directorate (from whence came Vlad Putin) who had turned against the Communist Party and were seeking to reform Russia.

In the end, Gorbachev was left the leader of a nation that had ceased to exist, the USSR, the object of popular wrath, a great statesman without a country, a Russian King Lear on a blasted heath.

Twenty years later, the world owes Gorbachev an enormous debt of gratitude for ending the Cold War, and freeing Eastern Europe and the Baltic states. Thank our lucky stars Gorbachev was in power when the Soviet Union met its inevitable collapse – or we could have faced World War III.

Mikhail Sergeyevitch Gorbachev showed that once in a millennium a great political leader can rise above the law of the jungle.

November 10, 2009

Source: http://www.lewrockwell.com/margolis/margolis168.html

5 Pakistanis still in Gitmo,Dr. Aafia still waiting for justice–>Hail Ya Nobel Peace Prize Committee

According to Foreign Minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi , there are still 5 Pakistanis  in Guantanamo Bay prison which Nobel Peace Prize winner President of USA promised to close around a year ago but as he got the prize on the bases of pure expectations not achievement so you can understand what liability he holds.

There is still no good news for Dr. Aafia despite Governments drama of making some good efforts, it’s a real shame for USA system of justice, Pakistani system of justice and security, international community and the civil society of world that they are not able to provide justice to an innocent women and her children (2 of which are reported to be killed under USA custody).

HAIL YA NOBEL PEACE PRIZE COMMITTEE FOR MAKING MOCKERY OF THE CONCEPTS OF PEACE AND HUMANITY!

Do watch Yvonne Ridley address on Dr. Aafia Siddiqi case at the end of this post.

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Five Pakistanis still in Gitmo, Qureshi tells National Assembly
Daily Times

Source:http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=2009\10\10\story_10-10-2009_pg7_36

ISLAMABAD:
Five Pakistanis are still imprisoned in Guantanamo Bay, Foreign Minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi told the National Assembly (NA) on Friday. In a written reply, the foreign minister told the House that the men are: Balochi Amar Ali, Khan Majid, Abu Rehman Abdul Rabbani, Rabbani Muhammad Ahmad Ghulam and Paracha Saifullah. Qureshi also told the House that the government was taking all possible measures for the repatriation of Dr Aafia Siddiqui from the US. The House was further told that total number of polio cases for the period from January 2007 to December 2008 is 117. Speaking on a point of order, PML-N MNA Faiz Muhammad Khan said funds allocated for the rehabilitation of earthquake affectees had been embezzled. He said the loans of the earthquake affectees were not written off and demanded an inquiry into the funds. The National assembly was informed that the government is concentrating on promotion of research in the agriculture sector with an objective to give boost to agricultural products. Parliamentary Secretary for Health Mehreen Razaq Bhutto said efforts have been made to control TB and 5,000 centres were working all over the country. Railways Minister Ghulam Ahmed Bilour told the House Pakistan Railways had planned to dualise the railway track between Lodhran and Peshawar. He said work on Lodhran-Raiwind section would be completed by December.
tahir niaz

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Aafia case adjourned–> The News
Source:http://www.thenews.com.pk/print1.asp?id=203156
Wednesday, October 14, 2009

LAHORE

THE Lahore High Court has been informed that Dr Aafia Siddiqui’s case cannot be taken to the International Court of Justice (ICJ) without the consent of America and Afghanistan.

A deputy attorney general, appearing on behalf of the Interior Ministry, said this on Tuesday in reply to a petition, filed by Barrister Iqbal Jafferry, seeking the court’s directions for invoking jurisdiction of the ICJ for recovery of Dr Aafia from the US detention.

The petitioner’s lawyer insisted that there was no need to get the consent of the US or Afghanistan as there was a treaty which allowed Pakistan to move the ICJ on its own.

However, the court adjourned hearing till October 30 and asked the petitioner to file his written reply in this regard.

Dr Aafia was reportedly arrested from Karachi on March 30, 2003, from outside her house to be taken to Afghanistan.

Later, she was transported to the US, where she was being tried under terrorism charges for attempting to kill two American investigators.

Two of her American national children were still missing while one of her child had been handed over to her sister by the Interior Ministry.

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Video of Yvonne Ridley Speaking on Dr. Aafia Case

Part 1:

Part 2:


Part 3:


What the idiots in Oslo were thinking when they chose Obama for Nobel Prize?

I don’t know what the idiots in Oslo were thinking when they chose Barrack Obama for the 2009 Nobel Peace Prize.

I don’t find any good reason, any big achievement by Obama or any peace process he started which can make him eligible for the honor.
This sure is a bad choice and not the first one in the list of bad choices.