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Posts Tagged ‘Mullah’

Iran-Pakistan gas pipeline, sectarianism and conflict of interests

I am in favor of allowing Iran to sell its gas or oil or anything freely in Pakistan to private sector without considering USA but strongly oppose this pipeline project which makes govt. to buy gas from tax payer’s money at 3.5+ times higher (from an average 3.5 $/MMBTU to 13$/MMBTU) rate than they buy today. It seems almost all political parties are afraid to take a stand on this and calling it a good project because of the religious black mailing Iranian sponsored mullahs and their followers do (not all Shias but only those who do it and they include Sunni groups as well).

Interesting to see that after a nice photo session with Khemenei and Ahmedinejad, MWM is also not putting any pressure on Zardari government like they were doing before. It seems establishment or at least those who may have got heavy kickbacks for this project have a boogeyman in the form of LeJ which they used to mobilize Shia population to pressurize political parties and civil society so that they will digest this deal in a hope of sectarian harmony. I have sympathies with those who died in this dirty game but people also need to see who is getting benefits from this game.

Pakistan is going all the way to risk sanctions but Iran is not giving any concessions on oil prices. Zardari government deliberately made sure that fuel mix for Pakistan don’t shift to a much cheaper option like coal and also Iran successfully made sure that Pakistan don’t get direct access to Central Asia gas. Now Iran is buying cheap gas from Turkmenistan and selling expensive gas to Pakistan.

Iran only supports those shias who kneel down to Khomenist regime in Iran otherwise it treats them with same carrot and stick policy which it exercises with Azerbaijan. Iran tried to play Shia card to create tension between Turkey-KSA and Azerbaijan and after failing in that it started to develop ties with Armenia which is the arch enemy of Azerbaijan (Turkey, KSA support Azerbaijan in territorial conflict between Azerbaijan and Armenia). Some reports even say that Iran supported Armenian militants in Karabakh war.

We also need to see who should hold high offices in the country to ensure that interests of Pakistan and its people are protected. They have banned the people with dual nationality to take part in elections or to hold high offices of responsibility. But what about those who have their spiritual-political or religious-political affiliations outside Pakistan?

Being a Sunni, Shia, Deobandi, Wahabi, Barelvi etc is another thing but recognizing authority of Waliat e Faqih or Amir ul Momnin position of Mullah Umar or Seestani or any other mullah or sufi which creates a conflict of interest between constitutional duties and these affiliations should be checked as well. Constitution says sovereignty belongs to Allah and talks about Quran and Sunnah not Mullah,Ayatollah, Sufi or some cultism thing.

We need to see whose wars we are fighting? or when we will stop presenting our people as fuel for these useless wars and conflicts serving the interests of ruling elite and their foreign masters?

Shehzad Roy’s Chal Para/Parha program and issue of text books with anti-India narrative and history

March 7, 2013 1 comment

I am not sure what is so bad about Shehzad Roy’s opinion about excluding chapters related to Muslim conquerors from text books of early classes? Instead of indoctrinating with a predefined opinion (right or wrong) focus should be on capacity building of a child’s brain. Once the brain is developed to think freely then present history with alternate view points on it so that a child can make up his own mind on the issues. Whats wrong with that?

The problem is that most people seem to be used to of blind following of their sufis, mullahs, ayotullahs etc and too much into blind nationalism. Is it necessary to develop a child’s brain on india hatred? Yes, we have problems with India over Kashmir and many other issues but instead of teaching them establishment’s version of history we can help them develop an understanding of concepts like freedom, justice, free thinking etc and I am sure once a child will grow up and if he sees injustice being done not only in Kashmir but also in FATA, Balochistan etc then he will develop discontent with the situation in these areas.

The problem is they want to develop hatred with India or other enemies but not with the injustices they were doing which lead to divisions because the establishment and their supporters are doing injustices in their own country which are sometime worse than what India is doing in Kashmir. India never used aerial bombings on occupied Kashmir’s civil population but Pakistan establishment did it many times on tribal areas.

We need to understand that Jinnah and Iqbal were not brought up on India hatred but still they are known as founders of Pakistan.

Intolerance and current mess:A note on Salman Taseer Murder

January 6, 2011 9 comments

Recent murder of former Punjab Governor, Salman Taseer has left many things for us to think over. I really disagree with Salman Taseer,his politics and many other things especially of exploiting the blasphemy issue for political gain. But the issue for which he was killed is of academic and legal nature and there was no reason for anyone to kill him for this reason. This really shows the absence of Rule of Law in our country and also it shows the flaws in training of our security forces as the person(Mumtaz Qadri) who killed him was part of Punjab Police.

Apart from intolerance another issue for me is that our establishment can use the current situation to take out those whom they disagree with, whether they belong to this or that side of the issue. 

Rememeber its the policy of establishment ,to use sectarian and social class differences to expand the war for dollars, which has also contributed to the current mess.

The ideas which were floated to expand the war, especially in last 3-4 years, are really destroying our social fabric. We always had differences and diversity in terms of religion, sects and social classes but things were not that bad as today.

Sectarianism converted into sectarian violence from the time of Iranian revolution as attempts were made to replicate the revolution which many saw as sectarian based revolution. Later Afghan war, flow of weapons and boneless policy making added to the fuel. Iran-Iraq conflict and Arab-Iran tension also made the situation worse.

But even after that things were not that bad as today and even in 90s we were not that intolerant as a society. Current mess is a result of the unwanted dollar war we are fighting.

Not only Pakistan jumped into a foreign war but Pakistani establishment floated ridiculous ideas in masses to use sects against sects , ethnicities against ethnicities and social classes against social classes.

The thing is that people who were supported by the establishment to take forward the war on terror against Taliban are now among those who are also or mainly supporting the act of Mumtaz Qadri. Also now a false sense unity is being promoted in different sects on the basis of the issue, which has nothing to do with the teaching of Quran and Sunnah, to start another clash between social classes.

Quran even teaches us to be reasonable and “Just” with those who are involved in doing bad with us or who don’t agree with us but are peaceful with us.

Do not allow your hatred of a folk who  stopped your going to the Inviolable Place of Worship seduce you to transgress; but help ye one another unto righteousness and pious duty.  Help not one another unto sin and transgression, but keep your duty to God(5:2)

God does not forbid you to be kind to those who do not take arms against you.  God loves those who are just (60:8)

There is no compulsion in religion” (2:256)

Had God willed, they had not been idolatrous.  We have not set thee as a keeper over them, nor art thou responsible for them” (6:107)

Using Wahabis and Sufis against each other, Liberals and Mullahs against each other or invoking Deobandi/Barelwi  and Shia/Sunni clashes to serve the “Divide and Rule” policy or to introduce the bogus concepts of “Pakistani Brand of Islam” in line with the wishes and  ideals of establishment and their foreign masters can only result in destruction of our country.

Ideas like fight against Takfeeris especially to justify Lal Masjid Operation and Swat Operations, fight against Yazidis, fight against people who don’t believe in Prophet (S.A.W) according to the standards they have set or spreading things like Mullah Umar’s one eye is the eye of Dajjal or spreading fake ideas like Ghazwa e Hind (To glorify the role of Pakistan Army and the dollar wars they fight) which are not part of any authentic teachings of Islam, all have contributed to this disastrous situation.

I mean it’s a real big mess we are into and it will take real honest and just approach to get out of this. We are in a real self destruction mode and we have to come out of it.

Why the West craves materialism & why the East sticks to religion

My generation grew up at a time when colonial hang up was at its peak. Our older generation had been slaves and had a huge inferiority complex of the British. The school I went to was similar to all elite schools in Pakistan. Despite gaining independent, they were, and still are, producing replicas of public schoolboys rather than Pakistanis.

I read Shakespeare, which was fine, but no Allama Iqbal — the national poet of Pakistan. The class on Islamic studies was not taken seriously, and when I left school I was considered among the elite of the country because I could speak English and wore Western clothes.

Despite periodically shouting ‘Pakistan Zindabad’ in school functions, I considered my own culture backward and religion outdated. Among our group if any one talked about religion, prayed or kept a beard he was immediately branded a Mullah.

Because of the power of the Western media, our heroes were Western movie stars or pop stars. When I went to Oxford already burdened with this hang up, things didn’t get any easier. At Oxford, not just Islam, but all religions were considered anachronism.

Science had replaced religion and if something couldn’t be logically proved it did not exist. All supernatural stuff was confined to the movies. Philosophers like Darwin, who with his half-baked theory of evolution had supposedly disproved the creation of men and hence religion, were read and revered.

Moreover, European history reflected its awful experience with religion. The horrors committed by the Christian clergy during the Inquisition era had left a powerful impact on the Western mind.

To understand why the West is so keen on secularism, one should go to places like Cordoba in Spain and see the torture apparatus used during the Spanish Inquisition. Also the persecution of scientists as heretics by the clergy had convinced the Europeans that all religions are regressive.

However, the biggest factor that drove people like me away from religion was the selective Islam practiced by most of its preachers. In short, there was a huge difference between what they practiced and what they preached. Also, rather than explaining the philosophy behind the religion, there was an overemphasis on rituals.

I feel that humans are different to animals. While, the latter can be drilled, humans need to be intellectually convinced. That is why the Qur’an constantly appeals to reason. The worst, of course, was the exploitation of Islam for political gains by various individuals or groups.

Hence, it was a miracle I did not become an atheist. The only reason why I did not was the powerful religious influence my mother wielded on me since my childhood. It was not so much out of conviction but love for her that I stayed a Muslim.

However, my Islam was selective. I accepted only parts of the religion that suited me. Prayers were restricted to Eid days and occasionally on Fridays, when my father insisted on taking me to the mosque with him.

All in all I was smoothly moving to becoming a Pukka Brown Sahib. After all I had the right credentials in terms of school, university and, above all, acceptability in the English aristocracy, something that our brown sahibs would give their lives for. So what led me to do a ‘lota’ on the Brown Sahib culture and instead become a ‘desi’?

Well it did not just happen overnight.

Firstly, the inferiority complex that my generation had inherited gradually went as I developed into a world-class athlete. Secondly, I was in the unique position of living between two cultures. I began to see the advantages and the disadvantages of both societies.

In Western societies, institutions were strong while they were collapsing in our country. However, there was an area where we were and still are superior, and that is our family life. I began to realize that this was the Western society’s biggest loss. In trying to free itself from the oppression of the clergy, they had removed both God and religion from their lives.

While science, no matter how much it progresses, can answer a lot of questions — two questions it will never be able to answer: One, what is the purpose of our existence and two, what happens to us when we die?

It is this vacuum that I felt created the materialistic and the hedonistic culture. If this is the only life then one must make hay while the sun shines — and in order to do so one needs money. Such a culture is bound to cause psychological problems in a human being, as there was going to be an imbalance between the body and the soul.

Consequently, in the US, which has shown the greatest materialistic progress while giving its citizens numerous rights, almost 60 percent of the population consult psychiatrists. Yet, amazingly in modern psychology, there is no study of the human soul. Sweden and Switzerland, who provide the most welfare to their citizens, also have the highest suicide rates. Hence, man is not necessarily content with material well being and needs something more.

Since all morality has it roots in religion, once religion was removed, immorality has progressively grown since the 70s. Its direct impact has been on family life. In the UK, the divorce rate is 60 percent, while it is estimated that there are over 35 percent single mothers. The crime rate is rising in almost all Western societies, but the most disturbing fact is the alarming increase in racism. While science always tries to prove the inequality of man (recent survey showing the American Black to be genetically less intelligent than whites) it is only religion that preaches the equality of man.

Between 1991 and 1997, it was estimated that total immigration into Europe was around 520,000, and there were racially motivated attacks all over, especially in Britain, France and Germany. In Pakistan during the Afghan war, we had over four million refugees, and despite the people being so much poorer, there was no racial tension.

There was a sequence of events in the 80s that moved me toward God as the Qur’an says: “There are signs for people of understanding.” One of them was cricket. As I was a student of the game, the more I understood the game, the more I began to realize that what I considered to be chance was, in fact, the will of Allah. A pattern which became clearer with time. But it was not until Salman Rushdie’s “Satanic Verses” that my understanding of Islam began to develop.

People like me who were living in the Western world bore the brunt of anti-Islam prejudice that followed the Muslim reaction to the book. We were left with two choices: fight or flight. Since I felt strongly that the attacks on Islam were unfair, I decided to fight. It was then I realized that I was not equipped to do so as my knowledge of Islam was inadequate. Hence I started my research and for me a period of my greatest enlightenment. I read scholars like Ali Shariati, Muhammad Asad, Iqbal, Gai Eaton, plus of course, a study of Qur’an.

I will try to explain as concisely as is possible, what “discovering the truth” meant for me. When the believers are addressed in the Qur’an, it always says, “Those who believe and do good deeds.” In other words, a Muslim has dual function, one toward God and the other toward fellow human beings.

The greatest impact of believing in God for me, meant that I lost all fear of human beings. The Qur’an liberates man from man when it says that life and death and respect and humiliation are God’s jurisdiction, so we do not have to bow before other human beings.

Moreover, since this is a transitory world where we prepare for the eternal one, I broke out of the self-imposed prisons, such as growing old (such a curse in the Western world, as a result of which, plastic surgeons are having a field day), materialism, ego, what people say and so on. It is important to note that one does not eliminate earthly desires. But instead of being controlled by them, one controls them.

By following the second part of believing in Islam, I have become a better human being. Rather than being self-centered and living for the self, I feel that because the Almighty gave so much to me, in turn I must use that blessing to help the less privileged. This I did by following the fundamentals of Islam rather than becoming a Kalashnikov-wielding fanatic.

I have become a tolerant and a giving human being who feels compassion for the underprivileged. Instead of attributing success to myself, I know it is because of God’s will, hence I learned humility instead of arrogance.

Also, instead of the snobbish Brown Sahib attitude toward our masses, I believe in egalitarianism and strongly feel against the injustice done to the weak in our society. According to the Qur’an, “Oppression is worse than killing.” In fact only now do I understand the true meaning of Islam, if you submit to the will of Allah, you have inner peace.

Through my faith, I have discovered strength within me that I never knew existed and that has released my potential in life. I feel that in Pakistan we have selective Islam. Just believing in God and going through the rituals is not enough. One also has to be a good human being. I feel there are certain Western countries with far more Islamic traits than us in Pakistan, especially in the way they protect the rights of their citizens, or for that matter their justice system. In fact some of the finest individuals I know live there.

What I dislike about them is their double standards in the way they protect the rights of their citizens but consider citizens of other countries as being somehow inferior to them as human being, e.g. dumping toxic waste in the Third World, advertising cigarettes that are not allowed in the West and selling drugs that are banned in the West.

One of the problems facing Pakistan is the polarization of two reactionary groups. On the one side is the Westernized group that looks upon Islam through Western eyes and has inadequate knowledge about the subject. It reacts strongly to anyone trying to impose Islam in society and wants only a selective part of the religion. On the other extreme is the group that reacts to this Westernized elite and in trying to become a defender of the faith, takes up such intolerant and self-righteous attitudes that are repugnant to the spirit of Islam.

What needs to be done is to somehow start a dialogue between the two extreme. In order for this to happen, the group on whom the greatest proportion of our educational resources are spent in this country must study Islam properly.

Whether they become practicing Muslims or believe in God is entirely a personal choice. As the Qur’an tells us there is “no compulsion in religion.” However, they must arm themselves with knowledge as a weapon to fight extremism. Just by turning up their noses at extremism the problem is not going to be solved.

The Qur’an calls Muslims “the middle nation”, not of extremes. The Holy Prophet (peace be upon him) was told to simply give the message and not worry whether people converted or not, therefore, there is no question in Islam of forcing your opinions on anyone else.

Moreover, we are told to respect other religions, their places of worship and their prophets. It should be noted that no Muslim missionaries or armies ever went to Malaysia or Indonesia. The people converted to Islam due to the high principles and impeccable character of the Muslim traders. At the moment, the worst advertisements for Islam are the countries with their selective Islam, especially where religion is used to deprive people of their rights. In fact, a society that obeys fundamentals of Islam has to be a liberal one.

If Pakistan’s Westernized class starts to study Islam, not only will it be able to help society fight sectarianism and extremism, but it will also make them realize what a progressive religion Islam is. They will also be able to help the Western world by articulating Islamic concepts. Recently, Prince Charles accepted that the Western world can learn from Islam. But how can this happen if the group that is in the best position to project Islam gets its attitudes from the West and considers Islam backward? Islam is a universal religion and that is why our Prophet (peace be upon him) was called a Mercy for all mankind.

By Imran Khan

A Must Watch Episode Of Islamabad Tonight On Negotiations With Taliban

January 28, 2010 1 comment

A Must Watch Episode Of Islamabad Tonight On Negotiations With Taliban.

Islamabad Tonight – 28th January 2010

Featuring PTI Chairman Imran Khan,Taliban leader Mullah Zaeef, General (R) Aslam Baig,Mushahid Hussain of PML-Q, Lt. General (R) Ali Jan Orakzai with Nadeem Malik as host.

via zSHARE video – isb_28thjan10.flv.

We need to think our way out of this war against humanity and peace for the sake of innocent lives we are losing everyday.

Pakistan should talk to the Taliban: Imran Khan –>DAWN

January 17, 2010 Leave a comment

Source : http://www.dawn.com/wps/wcm/connect/dawn-content-library/dawn/news/pakistan/18-pakistan-should-talk-to-the-taliban-imran-khan-am-07

LONDON: Cricketer turned politician Imran Khan called Thursday for the army to withdraw from Pakistan’s tribal areas and for talks with the Taliban, warning that the country faced “catastrophe” otherwise.

Khan said the US-Pakistan military offensive in the areas bordering Afghanistan was turning locals massively against the United States and boosting support for the militants.

US drone strikes on militants were sparking “anger and hatred” in the area, said Khan, who leads the marginal Tehrik-e-Insaf (Movement for Justice).

“The solution is to hold a dialogue with the militants,” he told an audience at the Chatham House foreign policy thinktank in London.

“The solution is to win them onto our side, not to bomb them with airstrikes.” Otherwise, he warned: “If we continue with this military operation we are facing a catastrophe.”

The militants operating in the tribal areas did not share the beliefs of the Afghan Taliban, who wanted to create an Islamist state, he said.

“In my opinion, they are political Taliban, they are not religious Taliban.”

“They will fade away as soon as the Pakistan army moves back and dialogue is held,” he added.

Khan said that Pakistan’s former military ruler Pervez Musharraf once described him as “a terrorist without a beard” for suggesting talks with the militants, but now it was an idea being promoted by others.

“Now even (Afghan President) Hamid Karzai considers (Taliban supreme leader) Mullah Omar to be a brother,” Khan added, to laughter from the audience.

He also criticised the tactics of the US military surge in Afghanistan.

“The only way I see the surge being effective is if they use their muscle to get the Taliban to the negotiating table.”

“If they use the surge for more bloodshed, I can guarantee they will leave behind — because they will leave — a far more radical government than the one it replaced.”

A US drone strike in the lawless northwest border area Thursday targeted Pakistani Taliban leader Hakimullah Mehsud, officials said, although the militia denied reports that he was among 10 killed. –AFP

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