Einstein Letter to Shepard Rifkin on Isareli Terrorists

One of the best minds in history, a great physicists and a Jew himself,Albert Einstein criticized the creation of  Israel by Zionist terrorists and called it a possible reason for future catastrophe for Jews.

Many Jews who believed in Orthodox Judaism also oppose the state of Israel and consider Zionism as anti-Semitic.
Below is the letter by Einstein to Shepard Rifkin on Israeli Terrorists.

The letter was written on 10th April after the massacre of Arabs at Deir Yassin by the Stern Gang terrorists or Lohamei Herut Yisrael (LEHI) meaning fighters for the freedom of Israel.

The Stern Gang terrorists were supported by American Friends of the Fighters for the Freedom of Israel and Mr. Shepard Rifkin was the executive director after the UN Partition of Palestine and prior to the creation of Israel in May 1948.


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Iftikhar sees increased need of independent judiciary –>The News

Iftikhar sees increased need of independent judiciary
By Usman Manzoor

ISLAMABAD: Deposed chief justice of Pakistan Iftikhar Muhammad Chaudhry has said the country is passing through a sensitive phase where the innocents were being killed, highlighting the need of an independent judiciary.

In his letter to all the bars of the country, Justice Iftikhar Muhammad Chaudhry wrote the struggle of the nation, especially that of the lawyers, for democracy and the judiciary has registered a respectful chapter in the history.

While greeting the lawyers and the nation on Eid, the deposed chief justice wrote dictatorship has died owing to the efforts of the lawyers and democracy was entering a new phase, adding the situation has changed a lot.

“Though the lawyers’ movement was yet to bear fruits but in the presence of brave knights like the lawyers no one under the sun could stop the imminent triumph from being blessed on us,” reads the letter, adding: “Your objectives are just, therefore, I believe that despite hardships and hurdles the victory would be yours because the flags of the righteous and just people never bow.”

He wished all the lawyers’ community and the nation with Eid greetings and prayed that may God save Pakistan from all harms. The deposed chief justice will offer his Eid prayers at the Faisal Mosque, Islamabad. He was unable to offer the last Eid prayer, as he was under detention along with his family.

The final countdown—>Legal Eye by Babar Sattar on Emergency mailing list

The final countdown
Legal eye
 
Saturday, May 17, 2008
Babar Sattar
 
The writer is a lawyer based in Islamabad. He is a Rhodes scholar and has an LL.M from Harvard Law School
 
Asif Zardari asserts that judges cannot be restored through an executive order for (a) the Dogar Court can stay such order thus creating a constitutional
crisis and (b) removing the midnight appointees of General Musharraf through an executive order would be wrong, just like removing the constitutional judges
was wrong, and that two wrongs don’t make a right. The arguments don’t really wash. It has been asserted in this space before that if a stay order issued
by the existing court is a real deterrent, then this entire debate is redundant. For the Dogar Court has already validated all the Nov 3 actions of the
general, including that of dismissing judges. Second, the rationale for restoring the Nov 2 judges is that the tenure of constitutionally appointed judges
is protected and they can only be removed pursuant to Article 209 proceedings, on the advice of the Supreme Judicial Council.
 
The deposed judges have been unlawfully restrained from performing duty as the mandatory removal process was not followed in ousting them. Thus they are
still judges and can be allowed to resume duty with an executive order acknowledging the same. The Article 209 protection doesn’t apply to the general’s
post-Nov 3 appointees, because they are not constitutionally appointed judges. The PPP, under the leadership of Mr Zardari, has refused to abide by this
majority opinion of the legal fraternity. Is it a coincident that the PPP has chosen to follow a minority and largely discredited legal opinion on the
proper mode of restoring judges pandered by the likes of Sharifuddin Pirzada and Hafiz Pirzada who are responsible in large part for our convoluted constitutional
jurisprudence? According to this opinion the general’s unconstitutional actions cannot be undone without a constitutional amendment or else we will set
a legal precedent that will have horrendous consequences for the nation.
 
What consequences are we talking about? If Hafiz Pirzada’s advice is adhered to, the precedent we are setting is that any unlawful changes made to the
constitution by a dictator by use of force will automatically attract the protection of the constitution, and can only be undone by meeting the high threshold
set to amend the constitution. The idea that if judges are restored through an executive order, the executive will in future be able to do all sorts of
crazy things through executive orders is simply preposterous. The executive order will simply be reiterating the twin constitutional principles that that
under no circumstance can (i) the constitution be amended without a two-thirds parliamentary majority required by Article 239 of the constitution, and
(ii) constitutionally-appointed judges be removed without following the process mandated by Article 209.
 
It is hard to believe that despite being counseled by Fakharudin G Ebrahim, Aitzaz Ahsan, Raza Rabbani and the legal opinion of sixteen judges including
almost all former chief justices, the PPP is still genuinely confused about the legal issues underlying this debate. Why then is this popular national
party jeopardizing its mandate by flip-flopping on the judges’ issue? A few explanations come to mind.
 
First, the negotiations between General Musharraf and Benazir Bhutto came to fruition in Dubai in the backdrop where the general was feeling the heat due
to the lawyers’ movement and wanted some respite. It is possible that some explicit promises with regard to the PPP supporting the general against Chief
Justice Iftikhar Chaudhary were made part of this deal. As this deal was brokered by the general’s western allies and supported by the UAE rulers — and
Mr Zardari duly credited the US for getting the general to shun his uniform on BB’s insistence — PPP’s current leadership might be convinced that reneging
on a promise made to the US and PPP’s other foreign sponsors will carry more political cost than backtracking on a popular domestic issue and breaking
a promise made to the people of Pakistan.
 
Second, there is a structural change underway in the composition of the establishment at the moment. Traditionally, the judiciary as an institution was
part of the establishment, and the PML-N and its successor political forces comprised the establishment’s B-team. And the PPP might have a point when it
complains that the judiciary has in the past applied the constitution more enthusiastically when the outcome favoured the PML-N as opposed to the PPP.
After March 9, 2007, however, the judiciary reluctantly decided to confront the egregiousness of the establishment and their divorce was finalized on Nov
3, 2007. Simultaneously, having learnt lessons from its time in exile and from suffering persecution at the hands of the Musharraf regime since Oct 12,
1999, the PML-N has also emerged as an anti-establishment party for the first time since its inception.
 
These two happenings have created a vacuum that the establishment wishes to fill by (i) resurrecting a court (that includes its post-Nov 3 midnight appointees)
committed to the status-quo, and (ii) co-opting a ‘reconciliation-seeking’ PPP that can function as the political ally of the establishment and will be
allowed to rule in return within the four corners of policy areas delegated to political governments during democratic times. This is certainly not another
grand conspiracy theory. We can replace the word ‘establishment’ with the term ‘status-quo forces’. The point being made is that the polity is undergoing
a structural transformation and the traditional actors that functioned as agents of status quo have opted to become forces of change.
 
Consequently it is extremely tempting for the PPP — which has ruled for a maximum of five years over the last three decades despite being the largest
political party of the country — to fill the pro-status quo slots that have opened up due to the coup of the judiciary and the PML-N, in return for being
treated as the favoured political entity by the establishment and overtly supported by the Dogar Court. The fact that the current PPP leadership is dominated
by individuals who have no popular roots in the masses and don’t seem beholden to Bhuttoism or the ideology of ‘roti, kapra aur makan’ — which by definition
is pro-people and anti-establishment — exacerbates the danger of the PPP chewing on this bate. Would it not be a grave tragedy if the predominant lessons
that the PPP has learnt in its 40-year existence turns out to be that (i) the desires of the US administration must trump wishes of Pakistani people when
the two are in conflict, and (ii) not getting on the wrong side of the establishment even at the cost of compromising principles makes for better politics?
 
The judges’ issue is one that has stirred the collective conscience of our nation like none other in recent history. What is at stake foremost is whether
we as a nation will side with rule of law or politics of expediency. The return of judges will not function as elixir for all the maladies afflicting Pakistan.
But if we squander this opportunity it will take at least a decade to raise another breed of judges who might muster the courage to stand and fight to
liberate the judiciary from the crutches of the establishment.
 
Second, many of Pakistan’s problems spring from the imbalance in the distribution of state authority between civil and military institutions. This is a
time in our history when the military needs to demonstrate its neutrality toward politics due to political compulsions and to protect its own institutional
interests. If our political elites fail to regain some of the lost ground in these circumstances, we might have to suffer another reckless dictator to
create overwhelming public support for such change.
 
And third, the restoration of judges brought about by dint of a freedom movement supported by the nation will be tremendously emancipating psychologically.
For too long have we given too much credit (or discredit) to the ‘forces that be’ for controlling our fate. But returning our judges against the wishes
of the establishment and its foreign patrons, we could prove to ourselves that we are not puppets but a sovereign people who have control over our present
and our future.
 
The issue of restoration isn’t merely a political dispute but one of individual and collective choices that is defining the personal identity and moral
standing of the actors involved. The lawyers’ movement has been advocating that the promise and practice of law must be brought into closer alignment and
this modest goal resonates will many around the country. The judges should be restored and can be restored but not without a forceful street movement that
forces our ruling political elite to acknowledge that people are not willing to allow the country to recede into another round of musical chairs between
conviction-less politicians and generals.
 
And to achieve that the lawyers must boycott all courts – not just higher courts — for at least a few weeks to bring the judicial system to a grinding
halt. It is time to move from the go-slow phase to the pens-down phase at this decisive stage of this historic movement. Without this and a forceful street
movement the deposed judges might be history.
 

Letter from the daughter of CJ of Pakistan Iftikhar Muhammad Chaudhry

I hope our Selfish politicians like Benazir,Fazal-ur-Rahman(he is an insult to the word maulana) etc  can understand the purpose of sacrifice the honorable non-PCO judges of Pakistan are giving.

Atleast we the students of Pakistan are with them and InshaAllah the goal of supremacy of justice will be achieved and the philosophy of might is right will become a forgotten thought.

The following is the full text of a letter written by the daughter of Pakistan’s deposed chief justice, obtained by the Guardian after it was smuggled out of his home where he and his family are currently detained under house arrest :

“I am a proud child”


This letter is for all the Judges who refused to take oath under PCO and who happen to be my uncles as well. I had never thought that one day I will have to convey my message to you people like this, through this mode but we know things are not smooth as they had been and it is one of our testing times.

This might be one of the crucial times we are facing but we should be proud that Allah chose us to sacrifice for this country. Yes it is indeed a sacrifice which we have to bequeath, not for ourselves but for this country. Ever since I opened my eyes I have seen my father affiliated with judiciary and now it is like a part of our lives. Our life is like a tree and judiciary is one of its branch. We have grown up with this branch and we cannot let anybody slice it. If we will not protect it then who else?

We may not be allowed to attend our schools or universities, we may have got our mobile phones blocked, we may not be allowed to meet anyone or go out, we may be kept in our homes like prisoners, we might be treated like militants or terrorists but WE DONOT CARE, because it’s a time of sacrifice and we have to do it.

We are proud to have elders like you who have made us proud. You people have made our lives, not only for us but for our next generations as well. We will feel proud to tell our youngsters that our elders did not succumb to any kind of pressure no matter how hard things were around them. We will always walk with our heads high and our hearts filled with pride. Thank you so much for giving this immortal gift to us.
I hope all of you are in best of your health and would read this letter. Love you all.

Yours Pinky (Palwasha Iftikhar Chaudhry)