Karachi Election Fraud Issue

Living in the city of Karachi for more than 25 years is enough for me to know how elections work in Karachi. In Karachi, we don’t have any kind of proper election process. Bogus votes, forced voting, on day rigging and creating an environment of fear to hijack elections and the city. MQM,ANP and PPP blame each other for terrorism, extortion and election frauds, and at the same time they are sitting in the government as allies. These three parties keep the game between them by exploiting ethnic differences and in reality they are allies and partners in status-quo. We have seen examples of 12 May 2007, 27 December 2007 or 9 April 2009 and how MQM, ANP and PPP destroyed the peace of Karachi.

In recent Supreme Court case on Karachi voter lists we are seeing some interesting things coming out. In an instance, a 200 yards house in NA 251 has 639 registered voters. The 200 yards house “Kashana e Zaheer”, in Karachi with 639 registered voters, should be declared a monument of election fraud and the ignorance of people who still love these extortionist mafias.

Some blind voters of MQM, ANP and PPP say that why their parties are being criticized. My answer to them is that if they want to live like sheeple or insects then its their choice, others might want to live like dignified human beings.

Below is the link of an interesting program on the issue having a discussion Farogh Naseem (MQM), Dr. Arif Alvi (PTI) and Nasarullah Shajee (JI):



What creates this hate?–>Dr Masooda Banu in The News

A sensible article as far as the overall idea is concerned with some real good points raised.

The writer has explained what motivates people to get ready for suicide bombings.

Though in many cases like the killing of Benazir Bhutto or recent attacks on International Islamic University and many others in which the chances of the involvement by CIA,RAW or even Pakistani Security agencies are more and 9/11 is seen as an inside job but still the overall context of the article remains quite valid.
What creates this hate?

Dissenting note

Friday, October 23, 2009
Dr Masooda Bano

The rise in suicide attacks in the past three weeks have left the nation shocked. The GHQ as well as ordinary institutions such as the International Islamic University (IIU) have been attacked. These attacks are making the government commit to starting even heavy military operations in Waziristan. But this increased number of suicide attacks needs to also raise the question why have some Pakistanis come to hate the rest so much that they are willing to take such extreme measures.

In the immediate aftermath of September 11, one dominant outcry in the US was that “Why have they come to hate us so much?” The question was never fully answered as the Bush administration soon moved into a militarist mode finding and attacking targets overseas. However, Pakistan cannot afford such a luxury because it is having to face the consequences of such a militarist approach on its own soil. There is thus the critical need to understand why some Pakistanis could be driven to a level of hatred that can result in making deadly attacks on other ordinary Pakistanis, such as the innocent students of IIU who so unfortunately died in the recent attack.

Those who try to attribute religious indoctrination as the prime basis of these suicide attacks have to provide better evidence to support such simplistic claims. Academic research on suicide missions conducted in either secular or religious contexts does not support the claim that suicide missions are ever driven purely by an ideological impulse. In fact, the basis of such a violent expression are often very political in nature, a religious or secular ideology only help sustain the momentum of the recruits after they have joined the struggle due to a feeling a sense of gross political injustice. To say that the militants in Pakistan are driven by some religious indoctrination where people are taught to hate others is too simplistic a solution. It helps ignore the more complex and demanding question that why are so many Pakistanis is a state of mind where they are willing to gather around the radical rhetoric and give up their own lives as well as taking life of other innocent people.

The answer to this is complex but one factor that could lead people to such extreme hate is the element of revenge. Those who suffer from the unjust excesses of the state end up retaliating in extreme ways because they find that there are no legal mechanisms left to secure justice. Palestinians pitted against Israel have faced that problem for long. I have not been to Swat during the period of military confrontation, nor I have been to Waziristan but I was closely engaged in studying the Lal Masjid and Jamia Hafza when it was staging the resistance and when it was under siege by the military. The state in this case was definitely an unjust aggressor. There was simply no need for the military operation that resulted in death of at the least 100 students.

The resist was triggered by some legitimate concerns about Pakistani military operations in the tribal belts and other issues such as that of the ‘missing people.’ It started moving in other directions, such as securing public piety, and of course needed to be curtailed. However, it could have been curtailed through a dialogue and through giving some concessions rather than opting for a full military operation. If today some relatives of students who died in those military operations had become recruits for such suicide attacks that are taking place in Pakistan, one won’t be surprised. Such gross level of injustice committed by a state is often not absorbed easily by those harmed by it.

What we have to remember if we want to find a solution to this problem that no one wants to give up his or her life for nothing. The promises of rewards in the other world could be tempting. To give up life in this world for promises of the rewards in the other is too extreme a measure, which is never just a product of search for heavenly rewards. After all, less costly measures, such as Haj, Hifz, fasting, khairat promise generous heavenly rewards too. There have to be actual political factors that are making people go to such extremes. Those who all along asked for making this “US-led war” our war now need to answer that what have we benefited from making it our war. If these are ordinary Pakistanis who are involved in these attacks, then we need to find out why they are doing this so that we are better placed to dissuade this from such actions. Cheering making an ever bigger and deadlier enemy out of them serves no purpose.

The writer is a research fellow at the Oxford University. Email: mb294@hotmail.com