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Graft in DHA Islamabad’s multi-billion projects alleged–>The Daily Mail

October 27, 2010 14 comments

Source : http://dailymailnews.com/1010/25/FrontPage/index1.php

From Abdul Jabbar Khan

Karachi – As the chief of Public Accounts Committee and leader of opposition in the National Assembly Chaudhry Nisar Ali Khan is reported to have taken a serious view on the question of allotments of plots in DHA Islamabad, the Transparency International has alleged the Public Procurement Rule’ violation and prayed the Supreme Court for an action, highly placed sources confided to The Daily Mail.
The investigations show that although the case is old yet it requires to be dispensed with soon. However, the DHA authorities have not shown seriousness to remove anomalies, arresting the trend of corruption and stopping forthwith irregularities in the land allocation, appropriation and allotment.
The Transparency International referred to its various letters on alleged violation by DHA Islamabad and finally the complain was made on 5th July 2010 by overseas buyers at the overseas sector of DHA. A reminder was also sent on 14th October by Transparency International Pakistan.
This state of affairs has earned a bad name to the country and its government and allied subordinate organisations. The Transparency and Public Accounts Committee took serious notices of the situation where DHA had failed to clarify the allegations in payment and allotment of plots to the overseas buyers.
It is alleged that DHA has violated the requirement of PPRA Ordinance 2002 and Public Procurement Rules 2004 and DHA Islamabad Ordinance 2005 and 2007 which awarded contracts to M/s Bahria Town and M/s Habib Rafiq Limited worth billions of rupees comprising thousands of acres to M/s Bahria Town and Habib Rafiq Limited 2009 for “DHA Valley and DHA Valley Overseas Block” and contract of HRL on 18th May, 2006 for the development of Phase-I Extension and earth an breaking ceremony was carried out on 6th June. The total area under consideration for development is 1500 acres in Phase-I extension.
The DHA also awarded contracts against rules to M/s J.I.N. Associates Marketing Agency and contract of M/s Meinhardt Pakistan Pvt Limited 2006, for providing consultancy services on development of Phase II DHA did not clarify alleged violations for the reasons known best to the DHA officials.
The TI Pakistan is of the view that DHA Islamabad is blatantly violating the laws which are applicable to DHA Islamabad.
These two laws are very clear: Relevant sources said that DHA Islamabad was established under the Federal Law DHA Islamabad Ordinance 2005 and also controlled by the Ministry of Defence. PPRA Letter to Ministry of Defence, dated 15 June 2009 also confirmed this position which is applicable on DHA Islamabad.
One more violation of law, reported by the complainant, is that though even DHA Islamabad has not been authorised to collect municipal charges, taxes, which is only allowed to the local government of the Cantonment Board, under the laws of Pakistan but DHA has allowed these charges, as maintenance charges to be paid to M/s Bahria Town and M/s Habib Rafique Limited for 25 years.
The sources said, if the investigations were carried out by a credible agency with no political interest thereof, it would certainly lead to massive financial irregularities, nepotism and favoritism at the cost of the national exchequer.

Rule of Law –>Dr. A Q Khan

February 10, 2010 3 comments

Random thoughts
Dr A Q Khan

Source : http://draqkhan.com.pk/index.php/2010/01/rule-of-law/


The duty of a government is to protect the lives and belongings of the public. It is duty-bound to provide justice without discrimination and to ensure the basic necessities of life.

Mahmood of Ghazni was a great king and his empire stretched across a vast area. One day a caravan was looted by dacoits within his kingdom and some travellers, including a young man, were killed. The old mother of that young man went to the court of the king and complained bitterly about it. When Mahmood made the lame excuse that it was a far off place, she became infuriated and reprimanded him for conquering such far off places even though he could not ensure the security of his subjects there. The king immediately ordered a contingent of soldiers to go to the spot and impose the government’s writ.

In the olden days rulers did not hesitate to acknowledge their mistakes and apologise and accepting shortcomings, and advice was not considered something to be ashamed of. Kings and rulers of old were said to be absolute rulers with unquestionable authority, but the common man had access to them. Justice was dispensed promptly and there was no way of escape, even for the rich and powerful.

Caliph Umar (RA) punished his own son through lashing. Hajjaj Bin Yusuf punished the corrupt by lashing, and Sher Shah Suri punished his son in the same way when he was caught sitting on an elephant and teasing the wife of a poor man. Emperor Jehangir had a bell hung at the gate of his palace which any needy or aggrieved person could peal in order to get prompt justice or help. Mirza Ghalib was arrested for allowing gambling in his house and was prosecuted in the court of Mufti Sadruddin Arzu (Ghalib’s own disciple) who convicted him according to the law, but paid the fine from his own pocket.

Hundreds of years before the birth of Prophet Isa (PBUH), there lived an Emperor in India by the name of Vikramajit (Vikamadattya), who had his capital in Ujjani (near Bhopal). The concept of “Nau Ratan” (nine wise people) originated in his court. They were persons famous for their wisdom and knowledge. Famous poet and playwright Kali Das, who wrote Shakuntala and Maghdoot, was one of them. Vikramajit is reported to have had the blessings of Almighty God to extract evidence from stones, trees, birds, and animals. He was famous for dispensing justice.

The Moghul Dynasty flourished just as long as the rulers were honest, God-fearing and just. After the death of Aurangzeb, the dynasty deteriorated and ultimately disintegrated and many local rulers declared themselves autonomous, making it possible for the British to colonise the whole subcontinent. The British cleverly applied the concept of “divide and rule” and regularly paid those who were willing to take up arms against the Indian rulers. Consequently, the Moghul Empire became limited to the Red Fort in Delhi.

The success of the British was due to their intelligence and intrigues and also because of the differences between the local rulers, their cruel and corrupt rule and the absence of justice and rule of law. The uprising of 1857 put the last nail into Indian rulers’ coffin. The British gradually conquered the whole of the subcontinent and also made meticulous plans to keep it under their control for as long as possible. They eliminated those whom they considered to be nationalists, replacing them with stooges to make use of their services as and when required, as was done in both World Wars. They established Fort William College at Calcutta where British colonialists were compulsorily taught Urdu. Some became so fluent that they even became Urdu poets.

The British were wise in that they decided not to disturb local laws and religious traditions. Marriage and inheritance laws were left untouched and Maulvis and Pandits were employed to take care of these matters. They did not force people to learn English, but whoever spoke the language were assured of good jobs. They conferred titles on those who translated the Civil Procedure Code, the Indian Penal Code and other British laws into Urdu, notably Shamsul Ulema Deputy Nazir Ahmed. They did not change the names of the cities and abstained from interference in religious matters.

Hindu and Muslims festivals were declared holidays and loyal Muslim and Hindu officers were given titles such as Khan Bahadur, Rai Bahadur, Sir, etc. In the police force, the constable, head constable, inspector, DSP, SP and DIG were locals. Only the IG Police was British. Similarly, in the Revenue Department, the Patwari, Tehsildar and deputy revenue commissioner were Indians and only the revenue commissioner was British. In the army, the ranks of soldier to colonel were filled by Indians and those of Brigadier General and above by British.

There was no favouritism, nepotism, superseding of officials, corruption in civil work contracts, etc. Consequently, the quality of the work carried out was of such high standard that many roads, bridges and buildings still stand today and are in relatively good condition. People respected the law and fear of punishment kept them from breaking it. Law was the same for everybody. Immediately after Partition, the leaders and law enforcing agencies were honest, but within a few years corruption, nepotism and favouritism became the order of the day. Nowadays people are even committing suicide (or suicide bombings?) and the rulers are least bothered.

The Indians did a much better job. Its independent area was reduced to less than the size of Pakistan because 553 states were sovereign. However, Sardar Patel, the home and deputy prime minister, immediately annexed all the states and also abolished the Jagirdari System, thus saving the country from future intrigues and manipulation by a few rich families. We failed to take similar action. During the rule of Liaquat Ali Khan we had such a good system in place that the editor of Blitz, Mr Karanjia, advised the chief minister of Bombay, Mr Murarji Desai, to visit Pakistan and learn about good governance.

Soon autocracy and dictatorship destroyed the very fabric of the country and we are now known as one of the most corrupt, intriguing and cheating nations of the world. The ruling elite has only one purpose in mind – how to earn money quickly, by whatever means. Courts became corrupt, further facilitating the rulers in their nefarious activities. Stolen money was transferred abroad and property bought. If a case was initiated, it dragged on for years and was ultimately dropped.

Contrary to general expectations, the military rulers turned out to be no better. Dictators, having very little public support, relied on foreign powers and sold the sovereignty of the country in return for personal survival. The result is there for all to see. Loans worth almost Rs200 billion have been written off, foreign debt has increased, submission to foreign dictates is the norm, selling citizens for bounties has become acceptable, and foreign powers have been allowed to operate within the country and kill locals with impunity. Our leaders have not learnt to apply economic austerity. Our only survival lies in a popular public uprising and cleansing of the whole system, once and for all.

Over Rs193b loans written off in 12 years, SC told–>The Nation

December 27, 2009 Leave a comment

Source:http://www.nation.com.pk/pakistan-news-newspaper-daily-english-online/Politics/23-Dec-2009/Over-Rs193b-loans-written-off-in-12-years-SC-told

The Nation

By Zahid Gishkori

ISLAMABAD – The big guns of Pakistan got their over Rs 193.403 billion bank loans written off on the decisions taken by the financial teams of various governments from 1997 to 2009.
This shocking revelation was made in a report of State Bank of Pakistan (SBP) submitted before the Supreme Court. The report mentioned the names of those individuals and organisations who had got billion of rupees waived off causing a massive loss to the public exchequer and facilitating the privileged of the previous governments.
According to the list consisting bank-wise summary of written-off loans of 37 banks, that is also available with TheNation, the loans of around 19,711 individuals were written off within the period of last 12 years.
A three-member bench of SCP headed by Chief Justice Iftikhar Muhammad Chaudhry heard a suo moto case of Rs 54 billion written off loans case that has been pending in the apex court since November 2007.
“Over Rs 300 billion have been waived off by influential persons in the state as the arguments were being presented by the lawyers before the apex court,” the bench observed.
The SC started proceedings of the case on the request of a few citizens for public interest here on Tuesday. Chief Justice in his remarks said, “How will the looted money be recovered from the big guns of the country? Through which device can the public wealth be returned from the babus?” he questioned.
Criticising the government on failure of recovery from defaulters, he said the list of loans must be prepared at provincial levels so that cases of waiving off the loans in each province could be listed. He said court is ready to take on any resistance.
The court has directed the Governor SBP to sort out recovery mechanism of the loans waived off. It directed to hold conference with the presidents of other 37 banks to inquire about the loans written off during 1971 till date.
Dr Ishratul Hussain would be summoned to guide the court while taking u

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